Posts

Showing posts from 2017

Lebanese association for history

Image

Jay Sean at URBN Caprice, Lebanon!

Image
This Wednesday, April 12, URBN is going “Down” with the man behind some of the biggest RnB dance tracks of all time, JAY SEAN.  Reserve on: 70 220 223

Massaya wine Lebanon, Pruning day at faqra

Image
Pruning day at Faqra
Wine making is a fascinating process that starts with healthy vines. Every year at this time we carry out a careful pruning of the vines to ensure they will grow strongly and deliver a high quality crop of grapes. And this is a process that you can take part in. We love it when our customers and friends come to help us and you will enjoy having a role in preparing this year's vintages.
First, there are one or two things you need to know. We will provide the tools and give you some basic instructions. You need to choose some sturdy shoes as the ground is often stony. So, to be comfortable, make sure you have footwear with a tough sole. There's food too. We encourage everyone to help prepare lunch of Risotto and Cabri lamb dish. For those who wish to stay for lunch, the charge will be $25 after the pruning session. ___
The following day, Sunday April 9, the Fireplace res! taurant presents its new Spring-Summer buffet menu.
It's a sure sign that good times ar…

Batroun International Festival 2017

Image
Batroun International FestivalAugust 6: Beer, Wine & Seafood
August 12: Carole Samaha
August 18: Bonnie Tyler
August 19: Wael Kfoury
September 7/10: Batroun Mediterranean Film Festival

Get your tickets from Virgin Ticketing Box-Office!

Hidden history in Hamra's Captain's Cabin, hamra pubs restaurants beirut

BEIRUT: In the days of flashy pubs and pounding music, the dimly lit wooden facade of Captain’s Cabin stands out as a relic of a bygone era. Now over 50 years old, the ramshackle bar is one of Beirut’s historic landmarks. Tucked away along Sadat Street, a few meters off the main Hamra Street, Captain’s Cabin has weathered the storm of decades of war. Andre Toriz, an amicable man of Mexican origin, had just been born when his father and three Middle East Airlines pilots begun looking for a place to drink and play cards away from their wives’ reproachful looks. It was 1964 when the four men rented an old fish shop, covered its yellow tiles in wood, and transformed it into their new getaway. “My father was the only one among them not to be a pilot, but they all called him captain,” Toriz told The Daily Star. As more men started spending their layovers there, the place was expanded, and opened as a fully licensed bar and restaurant in 1972. Alongside its original decor, which includes wo…

Hardine village, north of Lebanon

Image
Hardine is home to 30 churches, many are dilapidated and others have collapsed over time, effectively leaving 20 churches that are still in good condition. This relatively high number of churches is indicative of the village’s important religious status. Some of the churches in Hardine are : Mar Takla Church in Haret Kassab, an ancient church that was renovated in 1830 by Saint Hardini’s father and again in 1871 by by his brother, Matanious, and his nephew, Boulos.Mar Tadros Historical Church, which dates back to the tenth century.Mar Challita, Mar Nohra and Mar Elias Churches, which are all found in mountain caves.Mar Yohanna Chkif Cell, which dates back to the Crusader period and is known today as the “Toubawi” Cell.Church of Mar Sarkis and Bakhos, where the baptism of Saint Hardini by Father Mikhael Thabet took place.Mar Shina Church, which has been standing in the village square since 1844. In addition, the headquarters of the Maronite Patriarchate was located in Hardine before it…

The Garden Show & Spring Festival 2017, Lebanon

Image

tips for Surviving in Lebanon By Dylan Kidson

Image
Lebanon is a complex country of charm, chaos and contradiction. Beirut, it’s capital, is the wild child of the Middle East. The country hasn’t fully recovered from its 15 year civil war, but people are eternally optimistic and live every day as if its their last. With the utmost respect to my Lebanese friends, I bring you the Lebanon Survival Guide: Ignore soldiers on the street. Don't panic when you see armed troops or even tanks, it’s normal. Don’t join any protests or take pictures of them and you’ll be fine. Locals are experts at distinguishing between fireworks and gunshots, so if they if they aren’t panicking you shouldn’t either. Use the triple greeting. The quickest way to fit in (especially if you’re a pale westerner) is to greet everyone in English, Arabic and French at once. Hi, kifak, ├ža va? After that, if you can’t speak the language, simply throw in the three most common expressions every few minutes: Laaa (you’re kidding, repeated quickly three times), yiiii (reall…

Rise above lebanon

Image
Producer: Two Wheels Across DOP: Christian Ghammachi Editing: Sebastien Leclercq Colour Grading: Belal Hibri(Rez Visual) Music and Sound Design: Karim Khneisser